Spring is all about new beginnings, the beginning of a new season, a new cycle, a time of re-birth and awakening. What a way to start a new beginning than to call in the element of FIRE to burn away the old, to create space for anew. This is a perfect example of the healing and transformational power of FIRE.

We have been busy working alongside Kettle Creek Conservation Authority over the past 6 months, and on Easter Sunday, the first stage of our new wildflower meadow, began. KCCA have been incredibly supportive in our dream to turn our hay field into a vibrant wildflower meadow (we are after all called Wildflowers Farm!), by awarding us funding through their Clean Water Stewardship program. Click here for more information

A wildflower meadow is a complete ecosystem all on its own providing food for a wide range of wildlife, including one of our faves, the HONEYBEE ! As you know, bees are vital to mankind, yet these beautiful insects are under considerable pressure from habitat loss and disease. So, we want to do what we kind to give back to our sweet pollinators, along with a whole host of wildlife, birds and insects.

Why BURN? Common practice these days is to use ROUND UP, to kill off the grasses, weeds and many woody plants to be able to start the restoration project, but if you know us at all, you will know that R.U. is kind of a bad word around here! We want to restore our land, whilst maintaining our rich organic soil. So, with much discussion, we came to the agreement that the safest way to protect our soil ecology whilst ridding of those pesky invasive grasses is to do a PRESCRIBED BURN, which was done by a wildfire specialist.

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For thousands of years, tall grass prairies and open meadows were kept free of trees by the occasional wildfires that cleared the landscape every 2-50 years. These fires were caused by lightening, or set intentionally by Native Americans. They had discovered that fire killed woody plants, but encouraged fruit bearing shrubs and forage producing grasslands. IMG_0029

Prescribed burns today are used most frequently to maintain and restore native grasslands. Prescribed burning can recycle nutrients tied up in old plant growth, improve poor quality forage, increase plant growth and improve certain wildlife habitat.

Check out our time lapse video of the prescribed burn here!

We are incredibly grateful to be able to follow our dreams with the support of KCCA, helping us to create the world we wish to see- full of flowers and bees!

Next up: the planting!